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over them. having a technological advantage. having a military advantage. they are not going to accept that. i think the reason our policy is prevention is because we understand what the consequences will be if we do not succeed in maintaining this. that is the point about containment. containment does not prevent the saudis for making this decision to go ahead and do this. and our ability to persuade them along the lines of, look, you can count on our insurance. i said before, the obama administration would be the third american investors and that says they cannot have this. right after the acquired this, we are going to go in and say, never mind, you can accept our insurance. they are not going to accept the insurance because they have already seen that what we said was not going to hold. the reason is so important to have prevention as an objective is that containment will fail if it comes to with least that measure. >> daniel, quickly, because i want to get to mike on the title of this report and what you think it implies in terms of policy. but quickly, steve referenced the studie
. i think -- i have a high degree of confidence in technological ability to move the funds right upward. >> ted truman? >> i thank you. ted truman from peterson institute for international economic. i thank you for your remarks which i think probably qualifies as one of the more sophisticated presentsations at brookings the last year. -- presentations at brookings the last year. my is a criticism you didn't mention. as an actual economist. that is the impact of this -- a, the impact of this on the rest of the world. and whether the in general, and whether in some sense a channel that you left out was the exchange rate effect. there is some suspicion, i think, in the world in general that in fact what you talked about was completely irrelevant and it's all about weakening the dollar. exporting unemployment, whatever you want to call it. and then the other part of it is you're also exporting at the price of inflation to parts of the world that don't want it. i would be interested in your response to that kind of criticism of this polcy. >> well, i mean first of all i will acknowled
of arguments made by some people saying, you know, the defense department is a major driver of technology, the defense department is what does the internet, cellphones, all these technologies. i don't know enough about it, i am not an expert on this, but i wonder if you could discuss that. is it pro-investment to spend money on the military? maybe the other argument is that if we are not wasting its money on things we don't have to spend on in terms of military systems, it might enhance technology. what is your view on that? >> my view is a two-part answer. a, the purpose of defense services broadly speaking is to defend capital against foreign aggressors, foreign to structure, both physical, human, etc. to the extent that the defense budget is too small, you might get too little investment. that is a reasonable argument. i don't think we are in that world, but that is a reasonable conceptual problem. the second point is how did we ever move from caves to buildings, from fire to telephony, etc., without a massive defense structure? some sort of under-incentive in the private sector to eng
, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decades. it is time to move forward. my plan would cut our oil imports in half, and invest in the clean energy cr
in the business is technology and metal side of things. the chinese have a 40-year plan for medical technology and innovation. we cannot have a 40 day plan here in washington. >> in the health care bill we say everybody else in the world would celebrate that and say how to expand our lead globally? the fda slows down approval by at least two years an additional comparison. go compete in cd can still be leaders in the world. pretty tough to do. >> the health care bill is a perfect example of the government getting in the way. thing about the dating -- of dictating to an interest company everything. we the government will decide that on your behalf. there's not a better example anything that has happened and the health care bill when comes to the government being in the way of businesses and entrepreneurs. >> you have all outlined the worst-case scenario. we mentioned earlier the fiscal cliff. that is what is leaning come november the seventh. they are already working on it. some republicans were already saying they will agree to those tax cuts. >> i think a lot of people you're talking about ar
for science and technology, georgetown day school, albert ion tine high school, halls without walls. thank you so much. we applaud you and your work. thank you so much on behalf of women and girls around the world. >> i would like to give a special shoutout to hillary clinton and the united population fund, yesterday in very high level meetings pledged nearly $50 million for a campaign to end child marriage. [applause] >> i'd like now to ask eleanor smeal to join me. i've had the great privilege of working with her for 25 years. she is one of the contemporary women's movements and one of its most recognized leaders. in 1980 she was the first to define and prove the gender gap that it existed and she has been a key force ever since to secure women's rights. please welcome eleanor smeal. [applause]. >> thank you this is quite a year for us. this is also the 25th anniversary for the feminist majority. and kathy never gets introduced in her own right. i want to introduce katherine spillar who has kept us going in so many ways and now is executive editor of "ms.." and that's not in name only, that'
a future. persistent technology here in western massachusetts, this is a real opportunity for the future. only if there is a way -- a well-educated work force. that starts and home school, on into community colleges, and on into universities. i want to say this is about priorities. that is how i see it. there will not be a single, magic bullet. what the priorities. students will have to pick up more of the costs of student loans. trice -- twice, senator brown voted to let students rates double. why? it would have forced to pay for it closing a loophole -- a loophole used by millionaires. it is called the new gingrich loophole. what are your priorities? protecting loopholes for millionaires or college education? >> great question. the cost of education is out of sight. we need to have an educated student population. my youngest daughter graduated. i understand. one of the largest driving forces behind the high cost of education is administrative costs. professor war makes about $350 thousand to teach a course. she got a zero interest loan and gets perks. it is interesting. kids are forced
have over 200,000 defense and technology jobs. rather than cutting back, we need to make sure we have a strong economy, a strong military. as far as our spending, i disagree with the president giving money -- if they cannot protect our embassies, they should not be getting our money. do not buy a friends. second't there is 60- rebuttal? >> no, there is not. >> island that on the first one. >> i thought i did, too. >> if we were both under the impression. >> virginia seniors who rely on social security benefits are in for a lifetime of work. almost 1 million virginians receiving social security check every month. they are very polite, receiving on average about 77% of their total monthly income from this alone. an aging society will put strain on the program into the future. how would you protect social security for today's seniors and a strengthened it for future generations. >> thank you. i think we need to preserve social security for current beneficiaries as well as in the future. social security beneficiaries have for their entire lives and paid into it. they ought to get the bene
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8